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7 Day Split Workout – The Complete Guide (2022)

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A 7-day split is one where you do some form of weight training every day. The approach is highly demanding and not beneficial for everyone because it requires a good understanding of proper programming and fatigue management. Dedicating yourself to daily training is challenging because it requires lots of discipline and enough free time.

Still, people used to high-frequency training, a will to push their boundaries, and enough free time can follow a 7-day split and make good progress. Daily training is demanding but offers numerous benefits when done correctly. Among the most notable benefits is that more frequent training means each workout can be quicker and less demanding. As a result, you don’t feel as drained after training sessions, and you can more easily manage muscle soreness. 

Another advantage of daily training is that you have more flexibility and can train all the major muscle groups more frequently. According to research, doing so can lead to more growth and strength gain in the long run (1, 2).

Today’s guide will cover everything you need to know about 7-day splits, the benefits, potential drawbacks, and how to approach them with grace and proper expectations. 

Is a 7-Day Split a Good Workout Split? 

A 7-day workout split is a decent training approach for certain people with enough free time and the will to hit the gym daily. The method isn’t for everyone simply because most people need at least a day or two of recovery to avoid burnout. Working out seven days per week is also not necessary for everyone simply because fewer workouts can be enough to optimize progress. 

Making any split work is about fatigue management and tackling each workout in a recovered or semi-recovered state. The rule applies to daily training, and everyone interested in such an approach must pay special attention to their post-workout recovery. Since you cannot leverage rest days to recover sufficiently, you must rely on proper programming (which we’ll discuss below), volume management, intelligent exercise selection, nutrition, and good sleep. 

One of the most important things to consider on a 7-day split is how much work you do in each workout. As mentioned above, daily workouts are beneficial because you don’t have to train as hard each time and leave the gym feeling exhausted. You have plenty of opportunities to stimulate your muscles, so managing your training volume better and avoiding excessively long sessions is essential.

woman deadlift barbell

Another thing to consider on a 7-day split is exercise selection. Some movements are more demanding than others, so it’s crucial to maintain a healthy balance of easier and more challenging activities. For example, Romanian deadlifts and lying curls train the hamstrings, but the two are different. Deadlifts are challenging and train your entire posterior chain, whereas hamstring curls mostly isolate the rear of your thighs without causing too much fatigue (3). The next thing to remember when planning your daily training is to give each muscle group at least 48 hours of recovery time.

Pros & Cons of the 7-Day Split 

Daily training comes with its share of benefits and drawbacks. On the one hand, seven weekly workouts can feel great because they allow you to gain momentum and make training a non-negotiable part of each day. But, such an approach can also be challenging to sustain, so it’s important to walk in with realistic expectations. With that in mind, let’s review some of the pros and cons of a 7-day split workout.

Pros

  • You can schedule your training in a variety of ways, including by following upper/lower, push/pull/legs, or body part split rules
  • Since you’re training frequently enough, each workout can be shorter and less demanding, preventing you from feeling overly tired by the time you’re finished
  • More frequent training is excellent for managing muscle soreness thanks to the repeated bout effect (4)
  • A 7-day split is useful for training all major muscle groups frequently enough and causing the necessary growth stimulus
  • Daily training is fantastic for training the primary lifts (deadlift, bench press, squat, etc.) more frequently to get the necessary practice for optimal strength gain (2)
  • Daily training can be a valuable tactic for making regular training a part of your life and not losing the momentum you’ve gained on a lower-frequency approach, such as a 4-day split

Cons

  • The most apparent drawback of daily training is that you don’t have any days off, which are necessary for taking a physical and mental break from working out
  • A 7-day split might not be sustainable for people with busier schedules because it forces you to carve out time for the gym every day
  • Daily training can be more expensive for people training at public gyms when you factor in commuting, a pricier gym membership, and other expenses
  • Daily training might seem like the fastest path to your fitness goals, but the majority of people don’t need such a demanding workout plan to make optimal progress
  • It can be challenging to program your training in a way that gives each muscle group the minimum 48 hours it needs to recover
  • Daily training can put you at a higher risk of overtraining or feeling burned out

Lessen your chances of overtraining by monitoring your workout plan with a workout tracker like Hevy.

Hevy – Workout Tracker

Create your own 7 day split with Hevy, and track your progress – for free

Rest Days and Signs of Overtraining

Proper recovery is crucial for long-term progress because it leads to the positive adaptations we all want to achieve with the training. Working out is the stressor that shocks your body, but recovery is what leads to the benefits: muscle growth, strength gain, etc. Lack of recovery means your body doesn’t have the time to adapt to the stimulus, and you’re left stagnating and overtrained.

Rest days are beneficial because you can still be active but give your muscles, joints, connective tissues, and central nervous system the time they need to recuperate. Healthy activities include light cardio, mobility work, yoga, and basic stretching of your pectorals, latissimus dorsi, quadriceps, hamstrings, and hips.

Good sleep is one crucial recovery tactic. Your body upregulates protein synthesis, repairs all of its tissue during sleep, and allows your brain to eliminate metabolic waste that accumulates during the day (5). According to CDC guidelines, we should sleep at least seven hours per night (6).

Eating enough calories is also necessary for optimal recovery as dieting for weight loss puts us in a weaker and more compromised position. You shouldn’t follow a 6-day or 7-day split unless you’re planning to eat more food and gain some weight. 

Similarly, you must pay careful attention to your protein and ensure a bare minimum of 0.7 grams per pound of body weight (7). For instance, if you weigh 170 lbs, consume at least 119 grams of protein daily. The nutrient is necessary for repairing your muscles and developing the individual muscle fibers, leading to hypertrophy. Protein is vital for many other processes inside your body and ensures good health and vitality (8).

Signs of Overtraining:

  • Irritability
  • Inability to sleep
  • Poor appetite
  • Gastrointestinal issues
  • Persistent muscle soreness
  • Muscle weakness
  • Loss of motivation to train
  • Steadily declining athletic performance

Integrating Cardio into a 7-Day Split 

Cardio, also known as cardiovascular exercise, is a form of aerobic training designed to improve your endurance and work capacity. Cardio improves your body’s ability to recover, burns calories, and promotes good health (9, 10). Aerobic exercise is also good for keeping your training fresh, becoming a more balanced athlete, and promoting recovery.

You must be careful with the type of cardio you choose, how long your sessions are, and how intensely you train. Doing too much cardio, picking a demanding activity, or pushing the intensity would lead to more fatigue, impairing your recovery and increasing the risk of overtraining.

People following a 7-day split should introduce cardio gradually and keep it within two to four weekly sessions. Your best option is to do cardio in the morning and lift in the evening, or vice-versa. Alternatively, do your weight session and finish with ten to twenty minutes of low-intensity cardio.

HIIT 
HIIT stands for high-intensity interval training and is a form of exercise where you perform short bursts of intense activity, followed by a brief recovery period. For example, sprinting for ten seconds and walking for a minute is a perfect example of a round of HIIT. You would repeat the sequence five to ten times and call it a day. HIIT principles apply to all sorts of activities, including running, riding a bike, jumping rope, etc.

Running
Running is one of the most natural and popular ways of doing cardio. Most people can learn to run correctly with minimal training, the activity doesn’t require any special equipment, and you can do it on a treadmill and outdoors. 

The only potential drawback of running is that it can be stressful on your hips, knees, and ankles, especially if you’re overweight. You should be careful with the activity, listen to your body, and gradually increase your sessions’ duration to avoid aches.

Biking 
Biking is also a natural and popular approach to cardiovascular exercise. Riding a bike is excellent because the activity works for people of all fitness levels, and you get to spend time outdoors, soaking up sunlight and breathing fresh air. 

Unlike running, biking is a low-impact activity. It doesn’t put as much stress on your joints, and it is a fantastic choice for beginners to aerobic exercise. People who don’t have a bike can perform the activity on a stationary bike at their local gym and reap many of the same benefits.

Jumping Rope
Jumping rope is a more advanced form of cardio that offers numerous unique benefits. First, you only need a rope to perform the activity anywhere, including the gym, local park, or home. Second, jumping rope is excellent for developing your athleticism, speed, and muscle coordination. Third, you can vary the intensity (speed) and learn many tricks to keep your workouts fresh and engaging. Since it involves your entire body, jumping rope is demanding, burns plenty of calories, and brings numerous health benefits.

Rowing
Rowing is a form of cardiovascular exercise that simultaneously trains your upper and lower body. Unlike other forms of cardio, rowing is engaging because you can switch up the intensity, complete fun challenges, and train all the major muscles in your body. 

The primary muscle groups involved in rowing are the back, shoulders, and biceps, but you also develop your midsection, forearms, and quadriceps. Another rowing benefit is that the activity is low-impact and doesn’t stress your joints and connective tissues.

Importance of Proper Warm Ups

Warming up well before training is one of the most beneficial things you can do to elevate your athletic performance, put yourself in the mental state for hard training, prepare your body, and reduce your injury risk (11, 12). 

A good warm-up elevates your core body temperature, promotes blood flow to your muscles, and warms up the synovial fluid that lubricates your joints. It also promotes enzymatic activity related to energy production, ensuring optimal performance during your workouts. 

Another underrated benefit of a good warm-up is that it can serve as a pre-workout ritual that gets you in the mood for training. Most people feel stiff, weak, and motivated when they get to the gym. But, as you start moving your body, you notice your energy levels rising, your body loosening up, and motivation skyrocketing. 

A proper warm-up includes some form of light cardio, dynamic stretching, warm-up sets, and static stretching (if needed). The combination of activities gets your heart pumping, loosens up your body, and prepares you for the heavy sets you’re about to do. Your mind-muscle connection and technique improve, your muscles stabilize the surrounding joints, and you can train safely.

Warm-up sets prepare your body for the exercises you’re about to do and allow you to detect stiff areas and aches before you start lifting heavy. The information is valuable because it will enable you to adjust your approach, mobilize stiff areas more, and put yourself in a better position to perform optimally. 

Static stretching is where you lengthen a muscle and maintain the position for 15 or more seconds. In contrast, dynamic stretching is where you actively lengthen and shorten a muscle numerous times. Seated hamstring stretches are a good example of the former, and leg swings are an excellent form of dynamic stretching for the hips.

How Should a 7-Day Split Workout be Structured?

The most important thing to keep in mind when structuring a 7-day split is to keep your per-session training volume low to moderate and give each muscle group enough recovery time. Each muscle group should get at least 48 hours of recovery, but you can train them more frequently if you don’t do too many sets per workout. Doing so is relatively easy when you set weekly volume targets for each muscle group and spread the volume across seven sessions. We’ll review numerous examples of what a 7-day program might look like to give you an idea if you decide to try the approach.

A full-body workout can work better than a split when training daily simply because it’s easier to program. The primary drawback is that your muscles never get more than 24 hours of recovery, which can cause problems for some people. Other options, including a push/pull/legs, upper/lower, and body part split, can also work, as each muscle would get more recovery time. 

Most bodybuilders steer clear of full-body training and instead go for modified body part splits, like upper/lower and push/pull/legs. It’s important to note that these are nothing more than ways of structuring your weekly training, so you shouldn’t obsess too much over your choice.

7-Day Workout Split: Beginner, Intermediate, and Advanced 

Beginners: 7-Day Split 

The following 7-day split is designed to work well for beginners. For instance, if you enjoy daily physical activity or can’t do long training sessions, the following might work well. The split is designed to promote strength gains and improve your performance on some key exercises, including the deadlift and bench press.

Level: Beginner

Day 1Day 2Day 3: Active Recovery DayDay 4
Bench Press (Barbell)
4 sets of 6 to 10 reps
Goblet Squat
3 sets of 10 to 12 reps
Lying Hamstring Curl (Machine)
3 sets of 12 to 15 reps
Deadlift (Barbell)
4 sets of 5 to 7 reps
Lat Pulldown (Cable)
4 sets of 10 to 12 reps
Bicep Curl (Machine)
3-4 sets of 12 to 15 reps
15 to 30 minutes:
Cardio of your choice (running, biking, etc.)
10 to 15 minutes: Mobility work based on specific needs
Bench Press – Close Grip (Barbell)
4 sets of 8 to 10 reps
Front Squat
3 sets of 8 to 12 reps
Glute Ham Raise
3 sets of 5 to 15 reps
Day 5Day 6Day 7
Bench Press (Dumbbell)
4 sets of 10 to 12 reps
Chin Up
3-4 sets of 3 to 10 reps
Lateral Raise (Dumbbell)
3 sets of 12 to 15 reps
Squat (Barbell)
4 sets of 6 to 10 reps
Romanian Deadlift (Dumbbell)
4 sets of 8 to 10 reps
Seated Calf Raise
4 sets of 10 to 15 reps
Bent Over Row (Barbell)
3 sets of 6 to 10 reps
Shoulder Press
(Dumbbell)
3 sets of 10 to 12 reps
Cable Fly Crossover
3 sets of 12 to 15 reps

Schedule:
Monday – Workout
Tuesday – Workout
Wednesday – Active Recovery Day
Thursday – Workout
Saturday – Workout
Sunday – Workout

Intermediate: 7-Day Split  

The following split is similar to the one for beginners, with the primary difference being that it features slightly more work (sets) and some direct work for the biceps and triceps. Moving from beginner to intermediate doesn’t necessarily mean changing your training entirely; simply increasing the volume is often more than enough. 

Level: Intermediate

Day 1Day 2Day 3: Active Recovery DayDay 4
Bench Press (Barbell)
4 sets of 6 to 10 reps
Goblet Squat
4 sets of 10 to 12 reps
Lying Hamstring Curl (Machine)
4 sets of 12 to 15 reps
Deadlift (Barbell)
4 sets of 5 to 7 reps
Lat Pulldown (Cable)
4 sets of 10 to 12 reps
Bicep Curl (Machine)
4 sets of 12 to 15 reps
15 to 30 minutes:
Cardio of your choice (running, biking, etc.)
10 to 15 minutes:
Mobility work based on specific needs
Bench Press – Close Grip (Barbell)
4 sets of 8 to 10 reps
Front Squat
4 sets of 8 to 12 reps
Glute Ham Raise
4 sets of 5 to 15 reps
Day 5Day 6Day 7
Bench Press (Dumbbell)
4 sets of 10 to 12 reps
Chin Up
4 sets of 3 to 10 reps
Lateral Raise (Dumbbell) 4 sets of 12 to 15 reps
Squat (Barbell)
4 sets of 6 to 10 reps
Romanian Deadlift (Dumbbell)
4 sets of 8 to 10 reps
Seated Calf Raise
4 sets of 10 to 15 reps
Triceps Rope Pushdown
3 sets of 12 to 20 reps
Bent Over Row (Barbell)
4 sets of 6 to 10 reps
Shoulder Press (Dumbbell)
4 sets of 10 to 12 reps
Cable Fly Crossover
4 sets of 12 to 15 reps

Schedule:
Monday – Workout
Tuesday – Workout
Wednesday – Active Recovery Day
Thursday – Workout
Friday – Workout
Saturday – Workout
Sunday – Workout

Advanced: 7-Day Split 

Advanced trainees often need more training volume to keep making good progress, so the following split features more exercises and more sets. It’s important to note that the following is quite demanding and not suited for every advanced trainee. You might want to do something less demanding, such as a 5-day split, before diving into daily training.

Level: Advanced

Day 1: ChestDay 2: BackDay 3: Active RecoveryDay 4: Legs and Abs
Bench Press (Barbell)
3 sets of 6 to 10 reps
Incline Bench Press (Dumbbell)
3 sets of 8 to 12 reps
Chest Dip
4 sets of 12 to 30 reps
Cable Fly Crossover
4 sets of 15 to 20 reps
Push Up
4 sets to failure
Pull Up
3 sets of 10 to 20 reps
Bent Over Row (Barbell)
3 sets of 8 to 12 reps
Dumbbell Row
3 sets of 12 to 15 reps
Lat Pulldown (Cable)
4 sets of 12 to 15 reps
Seated Cable Row
4 sets of 15 to 20 reps
Face Pull
3 sets to failure
Up to an hour: Light to moderate cardio of your choice
Mobility work and stretching: Address tight spots that bother you during training
Squat (Barbell)
3 sets of 6 to 10 reps
Romanian Deadlift (Dumbbell)
3 sets of 8 to 12 reps
Bulgarian Split Squat
3 sets of 10 to 12 reps (per leg)
Lying Leg Curl (Machine)
4 sets of 12 to 15 reps
Leg Extension (Machine)
4 sets to failure
Seated Calf Raise
4 sets to failure (12+ reps)
Cable Crunch
3 sets of 10 to 15 reps
Hanging Leg Raise
3 sets of 8 to 20 reps
Day 5: Shoulders and TrapsDay 6: Biceps and TricepsDay 7: Legs (glute-focused)
Overhead Press (Barbell) 3 sets of 6 to 10 reps
Upright Row (Barbell)
3 sets of 8 to 12 reps
Seated Shoulder Press (Machine)
3 sets of 12 to 15 slow reps
Shrug (Barbell)
3-4 sets of 8 to 12 reps
Lateral Raise (Dumbbell)
3 sets of 12 to 20 reps
Front Raise (Cable)
3 sets to failure
Bench Press – Close Grip (Barbell)
3-4 sets of 8 to 10 reps
EZ Bar Biceps Curl
3-4 sets of 8 to 10 reps
Triceps Rope Pushdown
3 sets of 10 to 15 reps
Hammer Curl (Cable)
3 sets of 10 to 15 reps
Skullcrusher (Dumbbell)
3 sets of 12 to 20 reps
Concentration Curl
3 sets of 12 to 20 reps
Hip Thrust (Barbell)
3-4 sets of 6 to 10 reps
Glute Ham Raise
3 sets of 8 to 15 reps
Cable Pull Through
3 sets of 12 to 15 reps
Glute Kickback (Machine)
3 sets of 15 to 20 reps (per side)

Schedule:
Monday – Chest
Tuesday – Back
Wednesday – Active recovery
Thursday – Legs and abs
Friday – Shoulders and Traps
Saturday – Biceps and triceps
Sunday – Legs (glute-focused)

7-Day Workout Splits: Push/Pull/Legs and Upper/Lower Split 

Push Pull Legs: 7-Day Split 

The following is an advanced version of the push/pull/legs split. It has six weekly sessions (two lower and four upper body workouts) and an active recovery day. People unaccustomed to such a high-frequency split might be better off trying the 3-day push/pull/legs version to see how the training approach feels. The sessions are relatively manageable because you’re not doing too many exercises or sets.

Level: Intermediate

Day 1: Push Day 2: PullDay 3: Legs Day 4: Rest (Cardio &/ Mobility Work &/ Yoga)
Shoulder Press (Dumbbell)
3 sets of 8 to 12 reps
Chest Press (Machine)
3 sets of 10 to 15 reps
Triceps Pushdown
3 sets of 12 to 15 reps
Lateral Raise (Dumbbell)
3 sets of 15 to 20 reps
Pendlay Row (Barbell)
3 sets of 6 to 10 reps
Inverted Row
3 sets of 10 to 15 reps
Seated Cable Row – Wide Grip
3 sets of 12 to 15 reps
Face Pulls
3 sets of 15 to 25 reps
Hammer Curl (Dumbbell) 3 sets of 12 to 20 reps
Squat (Barbell)
3 sets of 6 to 10 reps
Romanian Deadlift (Dumbbell)
3 sets of 8 to 12 reps
Lunge (Dumbbell)
3 sets of 10 to 12 reps (per leg)
Seated Calf Raise
3 sets of 12 to 15 reps
Up to 40 minutes: Light to moderate cardio of your choice
Mobility work and stretching: Address tight spots that bother you during training
Day 5: Push Day 6:  PullDay 7: Legs
Bench Press (Barbell)
3 sets of 6 to 10 reps
Shoulder Press (Machine)
3 sets of 12 to 15 reps
Skullcrusher (Dumbbell)
3 sets of 12 to 15 reps
Butterfly (Pec Deck)
3 sets of 15 to 20 reps
Pull Up
3 sets of 5 to 15 reps
T Bar Row
3 sets of 8 to 12 reps
Dumbbell Row
3 sets of 10 to 15 reps
Shrug (Dumbbell)
3 sets of 10 to 15 reps
Plate Curl
3 sets of 12 to 20 reps
Hip Thrust (Barbell)
3 sets of 6 to 10 reps
Bulgarian Split Squat
3 sets of 10 to 15 reps (per leg)
Seated Leg Curl (Machine)
3 sets of 12 to 20 reps
Standing Calf Raise (Machine)
3 sets of 8 to 12 reps

Schedule:
Monday – Push
Tuesday – Pull
Wednesday – Legs
Thursday – Active recovery
Friday – Push
Saturday – Pull
Sunday – Legs

Upper/Lower: 7-Day Split 

The final split we’ll look at today is a modified upper/lower routine. It features six weekly workouts, two for the upper and two for the lower body. You also get a couple of full-body workouts to change things up. An active recovery day is also designed to give you a break from the training and allow your muscles to recover.

man seated shoulder press dumbbell

Level: Intermediate/advanced

Day 1: Upper Day 2: Lower Day 3: Full Body Day 4: Active Recovery
Pull Up
3 sets of 5 to 15 reps
Shoulder Press (Dumbbell)
3 sets of 8 to 12 reps
Plate Curl
3 sets of 12 to 20 reps
Skullcrusher (Dumbbell)
3 sets of 12 to 15 reps
Inverted Row
3 sets of 10 to 15 reps
Hip Thrust (Barbell)
4 sets of 6 to 10 reps
Romanian Deadlift (Dumbbell)
4 sets of 8 to 12 reps
Bench Press (Barbell)
3 sets of 6 to 10 reps
Bulgarian Split Squat
3 sets of 10 to 15 reps (per leg)
Pendlay Row (Barbell)
3 sets of 6 to 10 reps
Butterfly (Pec Deck)
3 sets of 15 to 20 reps
Face Pulls
3 sets of 15 to 25 reps
Nothing specific, but do something active: yoga, stretching, cardio, etc.
Day 5: Upper Day 6:  Lower Day 7: Full body 
T Bar Row
3 sets of 8 to 12 reps
Chest Press (Machine)
3 sets of 10 to 15 reps
Triceps Pushdown
3 sets of 12 to 15 reps
Lateral Raise (Dumbbell)
3 sets of 15 to 20 reps
Seated Cable Row – Wide Grip
3 sets of 12 to 15 reps
Squat (Barbell)
3 sets of 6 to 10 reps
Lunge (Dumbbell)
3 sets of 10 to 12 reps (per leg)
Seated Calf Raise
3 sets of 12 to 15 reps
Dumbbell Row
3 sets of 10 to 15 reps
Shrug (Dumbbell)
3 sets of 10 to 15 reps
Seated Leg Curl (Machine)
3 sets of 12 to 20 reps
Shoulder Press (Machine)
3 sets of 12 to 15 reps
Standing Calf Raise (Machine)
3 sets of 8 to 12 reps
Hammer Curl (Dumbbell) 3 sets of 12 to 20 reps

Schedule:
Monday – Upper
Tuesday – Lower
Wednesday – Full Body
Thursday – Active recovery
Friday – Upper
Saturday – Lower
Sunday – Full Body

Bodyweight Mobility Workout

Flexibility measures a muscle’s ability to lengthen, whereas mobility encompasses flexibility, joint range of motion, muscle strength, and more. In other words, your mobility depends on neuromuscular control, muscles’ ability to lengthen, and how well a joint can move within its capsule. 

A bodyweight mobility workout improves the various factors determining your freedom of movement. For example, someone who struggles to squat due to joint limitations and lack of strength can leverage activities to improve their mobility. One practical approach would be to start squatting, increasing the depth over time. Doing so is entirely possible because the more you repeat an activity, your neuromuscular efficiency, flexibility, and joint range of motion improve. 

No single bodyweight mobility workout works for everyone because we each suffer from unique limitations. One person might struggle to squat due to hip tightness, whereas another could suffer from poor ankle mobility.

Your job is to look at your unique situation and determine what (if any) limitations hold you back from performing the various exercises in your training program. Filming some of your training sets or working with a trainer can help you find weak spots and create a good mobility routine to address them.

Though it may not seem that important, good mobility is necessary for safe and effective training that allows you to train your muscles through a full range of motion. Many trainees struggle to make significant long-term progress precisely because of physical limitations preventing them from training.

What 7-Day Split Workout is the Best for Bodybuilding? 

Training volume and frequency are the factors that matter most for optimal hypertrophy (1, 13). The best 7-day split for bodybuilding would allow you to do enough sets for each muscle group and train all major muscles at least twice per week. Organizing your workouts with a weightlifting app can help prevent overtraining and provide adequate time for recovery.

Hevy – Workout Tracker

Create your own 7 day split with Hevy, and track your progress – for free

We looked at several examples of good split workouts above, and each can be beneficial so long as you pay attention to your recovery and nutrition. Any split can be made better for bodybuilding when you increase the amount of work you do and swap more fatiguing exercises (e.g., Romanian deadlift) for less demanding ones (e.g., lying hamstring curl). 

Final Thoughts on the 7-Day Workout Split 

A 7-day workout split, also known as daily training, is a demanding approach designed to bring quicker results, help trainees overcome plateaus, and get results to the most advanced lifters. While such an approach might seem impossible to sustain by most people, it depends on how you schedule your weeks and program your sessions. 

The primary drawback with daily training is that your muscles don’t have as much time to recover, which can lead to overtraining if you don’t manage your sessions well. So, it’s essential to pay extra careful attention to other recovery methods. Good sleep, an adequate protein intake, and consuming plenty of calories will always be crucial for recovery, even more so on such a demanding split.

A notable benefit of daily training is that you can approach it in many ways and organize your training however you want. You also get to do the recommended number of sets for optimal progress without spending too much time in the gym.

Other Split Workouts Guides 

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